Category Archives: Commercial Beer

Grandma’s Closet Release.

Short notice, but the beer that I brewed at Sierra Nevada’s Beer Camp back in December finally got approved for the NY market.  Come grab a pint with me during the Brooklyn Brewsers homebrew club meeting this Monday, July 7th 7:00pm at Brouwerij Lane in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.  The beer is an IPA aged on Spanish Cedar and aptly named “Grandma’s Closet”.  Hope to see you there!

Ray Ray and Grandma

 

My boy Ray-Ray gettin’ down n’ dirty with grandma

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Sierra Nevada Beer Camp Recap

Well, I did it.  I survived Sierra Nevada’s Beer Camp.  While it was technically only two days of beer-themed events, my head is still spinning with the amount of people, places, information, and beer that I was exposed to while out in Chico, CA.  I was definitely “the guy taking pictures” in our group, but I felt that if I didn’t do so, my inebriated memory would fail me.  I curated my selection to (quite) a few pictures that generally goes in chronological order and best captures my time at the brewery.  Each picture will be captioned to give a bit more insight.

I’d like to believe that listening to a song or two while browsing this gallery will help you wrap your head around my giddy  recollections of Beer Camp, so I’d suggest New Radicals “Get What You Get” or  Quad City DJ’s “Space Jam Theme Song”.  I mean really the only logical choice is the Space Jam song, but I’m gonna leave the New Radical suggestion up in the hopes that you really pay attention to the lead singer’s dancing in that video.  It’s A+ work.

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Sierra Nevada Beer Camp 2013

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Well, they butchered my name, but I got a spot at Sierra Nevada Beer Camp this year.  Booyah!

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SaisonFest 2013

Saison Party_1

I ordered a bunch of American saisons at the beginning of the year and planned on doing a springtime saison tasting party.  Spring came and went, so I planned for summer.  I added to the bottle collection over the following months with anticipation building for the most ultimate of all ultimate beer gatherings.  In furtherance of my saison party prep, I brewed a ten gallon batch of saison and split the fermentation between two saison yeast strains so we’d have a homebrew representation.  And then summer passed (I showed a surprising amount of self-restraint not opening that ever growing stash of farmhouse style brews).  With cold weather looming, we decided to dust off the bottles, push the kegerator outside, buy a shitload of olives and cheese and get the party started.

Much fun was had, the weather was beautiful, and plenty of saisons were tasted.  Some standouts for me were the Boulevard Tank 7 (and Brett version), Logsdon Seizoen (and Brett version), Great Divide Colette, and Pretty Things Jack D’Or.  My homebrewed versions held up surprisingly well, and I’ve included some tasting notes below.

For these beers, I kept the grainbill pretty standard for a saison using 90% pilsner malt, 5% flaked wheat, and 5% table sugar (added to the fermentor).  As is often the case with my I’m-a-dad-now abbreviated brewing schedule, this batch performed double duty as part of a single-hop saison experiment for my Brooklyn Brewsers homebrew club.  I chose Crystal as the single hop for it’s noble hop similarities (most classic saisons use noble hops), making sure I didn’t go too far outside the box and have ten gallons of really weird beer to drink.

The wort was split between two yeast strains, Danstar Belle Saison and East Coast Yeast ECY08 Saison Brasserie (actually a blend of several saison strains).  Both were fermented starting at 72F and allowed to free rise to 80F over the course of fermentation.

Belle Saison

Appearance.  Somewhat hazy golden hue with a dense rocky head that persists.  Much clearer than ECY08 version.

Aroma.  The Brewsers chose to have everyone dry hop their saisons, so the hop aromatics were definitely accentuated.  That said, both yeast strains were still able to come through in the nose.  The Belle Saison has notes of mineral, citrus, lemon zest, spiciness, somewhat fresh-cut grass, hay, earthiness, and noble hops.

Taste and Mouthfeel. This version finished very dry (.996!) and with the extra carbonation was spritzy and refreshing on the tongue.  The initial dryness is accentuated by yeast notes of black pepper, delicate smooth bitterness, and noble hops popping one after another.  There is a distinct citrus note present, a lot of lemon and grapefruit. 

Overall Impressions.  Very drinkable.  This keg was gone (mostly from me) very quickly as it was my go to beer for a while.  I like the not-so-complex layers of flavor that seemed to get out of the way of each other.  This beer took a while to round out and after two months in the keg it was peaking, although it was almost gone at that point.

ECY08 Saison Brasserie

Appearance.  Same golden hue as Belle, but cloudy throughout its tenure in the keg.  I knew it was going to be this way after seeing them both post-fermentation with Belle Saison forming a nice thick trub pile at the bottom of the carboy and ECY08 as cloudy as a hefeweizen.

Aroma.  Very noticeable barnyard, minerally, citrus, reminds me a lot of Saison Dupont.  Lemons and grapefruit once again, most likely from the Crystal hops.

Taste and Mouthfeel. While not as dry as the Belle version, this beer finished respectably dry at 1.001.  Very spritzy and lively on the tongue as well, allowing the flavors to bounce around in your mouth.  Lemons and grapefruit present as well as mineral notes that set this apart from the Belle.  Grassy, earthy, and some spiciness, but mild compared to the black pepper present in the Belle Saison.

Overall Impressions. This beer, even at an advanced age, was more coarse than the other version, making me think of the word “rustic” for some reason.  Both beers took a while to come into their own, as is often the case with belgian-style beers.  One of the most interesting things for me about this split batch was my wife’s surprised reaction when I told her that the beers were exactly the same recipe except for the yeast strains — despite having the same grainbill, hop and fermentation process, the flavors of the two strains and yeast-driven esters made two completely different (and totally drinkable) beers.

*photo credit to Naoko Machida

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Send me to Sierra Nevada Beer Camp 2013!

I need your help getting into Sierra Nevada Beer Camp! Click on this link and vote for the video starring me (as a bear). Directed/filmed/edited by the amazing duo Justin Eure and Nicole Eure. You can vote for me once a day from now until September 30th, 2013.  Make a dude’s dreams come true!

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